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anitanh:

Color Problems: A Practical Manual for the Lay Student of Color by Emily Noyes Vanderpoel (New York: Longmans, 1903). Found in the Internet Archive by AnitaNH

Source: anitanh
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Starting my new job tomorrow. I will start making new lesson plans and posting them regularly. I will also post different resources that I find along the way. I should start posting regularly again before the month of May.

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Apologies for the long hiatus everyone, I graduated from college in May of last year and life took me away from my teaching. But I think in the next month or so I should be back in action. 

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14 Disturbing Stats About Racial Inequality in American Public Schools

blackinasia:

From the Department of Education:

  1. Black students accounted for 18 percent of the country’s pre-K enrollment, but made up 48 percent of preschoolers with multiple out-of-school suspensions.
  2. Black students were expelled at three times the rate of white students.
  3. American Indian and Native-Alaskan students represented less than 1 percent of students, but 3 percent of expulsions.
  4. Black girls were suspended at higher rates than all other girls and most boys.
  5. American Indian and Native-Alaskan girls were suspended at higher rates than white boys or girls.
  6. Nearly one in four boys of color, excepting Latino and Asian American students, with disabilities received an out-of-school suspension.
  7. One in five girls of color with disabilities received an out-of-school suspension.
  8. A quarter of the schools with the highest percentage of black and Latino students did not offer Algebra II.
  9. A third of these schools did not offer chemistry.
  10. Less than half of American Indian and Native-Alaskan high school students had access to the full range of math and science courses, which consists of Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, calculus, biology, chemistry and physics.
  11. Black and Latino students accounted for 40 percent of enrollment at schools with gifted programs, but only represented 26 percent of students in such programs.
  12. Black, Latino and Native American students attended schools with higher concentrations of first-year teachers (3 to 4 percent) than white students (1 percent).
  13. Black students were more than three times as likely to attend schools where fewer than 60 percent of teachers meet all state certification and licensure requirements.
  14. Latino students were twice as likely to attend such schools.

(h/t The Nation)

(via baritonepats)

Source: owning-my-truth
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sandrarivasart:

(Question from my Ask.fm account)

I’ve been asked a lot about developing styles and improving so I thought I would make an advice comic for you lovelies~ :>

It’s so hard to explain about our development in art styles. We may be influenced by the same things, but how we illustrate, express, and think is completely different. It’s not something you can buy or learn in a class.

Remember that age doesn’t matter and it’s never too late. You can draw whether you’re 30 or 13. You’re still young! And there’s no rush. We learn at our pace and should be proud of ourselves for continuing to draw. Not many people realize that art is a pretty tough field and I know a couple that have given up and chosen other paths.

Improvement will happen if you keep on doing what you love. It will take time but keep practicing and months (or years) from now you’ll be amazed at how much you’ve progressed. Soon your doodles that used to take you 2 hours will take only a minute or less.

But again, you have to just do it. This applies with music, performance, or anything else. Tutorials, books, and advices won’t mean anything unless you actually do it.

Don’t think about what anyone will think, if you’ll be famous or not, or if you’ll develop a “unique” style. Just start drawing. Fanart, figure drawing, animals, anime, just do it!!

You will improve and you will create great things. Just do it!!

I hope this helps!

(via thebawbmobile)

Source: sandrarivasart
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positivelypersistentteach:

We do it to our pre-k students now too.

(via liberationator)

Source: from-student-to-teacher
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Afrofuturism is an emergent literary and cultural aesthetic that combines elements of science fiction, historical fiction, fantasy, Afrocentricity, and magic realism with non-Western cosmologies in order to critique not only the present-day dilemmas of people of color, but also to revise, interrogate, and re-examine the historical events of the past. 

Surrealism is a cultural movement that began in the early 1920s, and is best known for its visual artworks and writings. The aim was to “resolve the previously contradictory conditions of dream and reality.” Artists painted unnerving, illogical scenes with photographic precision, created strange creatures from everyday objects and developed painting techniques that allowed the unconscious to express itself.

Futurism (Italian: Futurismo) was an artistic and social movement that originated in Italy in the early 20th century. It emphasized and glorified themes associated with contemporary concepts of the future, including speed, technology, youth and violence, and objects such as the car, the aeroplane and the industrial city.

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asuperfluousman:

I love the intensity with which academics proclaim their devotion to knowledge and public education, yet restrict access to their research and scholarly work. Their income derives from public funds, yet they resist any attempt to overthrow the gatekeepers and let the public access the culmination of their work.

(via weirdoautisticseacat)

Source: asuperfluousman